India to Open Market for U.S. Pork

47

The National Pork Producers Council (NPPC) today applauded the U.S. and Indian government’s announcement to allow imports of U.S. pork and pork products into India, the world’s second-most populous nation.

“After decades of work, a market that had been closed to U.S. pork is being opened,” said NPPC President Jen Sorenson. “NPPC thanks the Biden administration for reaching an agreement with India on market access for our products. We look forward to the new access, which will allow us to provide affordable, wholesome and nutritious U.S. pork products to consumers in India.”

India, which had a de facto ban on U.S. pork, has a population of 1.26 billion, meaning the potential market opportunity is significant. The agreement with the United States sets the stage for larger trade discussions.

In June 2019, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative terminated India’s participation in the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) program, which provides developing countries beneficial access to the U.S. market. USTR took that action because India did not provide equitable and reasonable U.S. access to its markets, including for U.S. pork.

Getting access to the Indian market has been one of NPPC’s top trade priorities, which also include: elimination of China’s retaliatory tariffs on U.S. pork, which are 37% while competitors’ are only 12%; broader market access in Southeast Asia, including through permanent reduction of tariffs in Vietnam and the Philippines; and unfettered market access for U.S. pork in Brazil, Ecuador, Indonesia, Jamaica, South Africa and Thailand, markets that are completely closed or only partially open to U.S. pork exports.