Genesus Global Technical Report, Minding Your Gilts’ Prenatal Environment

Minding Your Gilts’ Prenatal Environment Pius B. Mwansa, PhD   The lifelong performance of pigs is known to be affected by conditions during gestation (uterine) and early life (neonatal, 21 days after birth). Adverse conditions and stressors during gestation or nursing can have a negative impact on a gilts performance during their lifetime and can

INFLUENZA: A GROWING THREAT TO YOUR SWINE HERD’S POTENTIAL Production losses from influenza can total more than $3 per head

Influenza A virus in swine (IAV-S) has been present in U.S. herds for nearly 100 years,1 and until recently, was less complicated for producers and veterinarians to manage. Today, however, due to its endemic presence in swine populations in North and South America, Asia and Europe,1 as well as the emergence of new virus strains

Tyson Foods to build on forecast-beating results, despite beef, pork headwinds

Source: Agrimoney Tyson Foods followed up the release of forecast-beating results by estimating a further increase in earnings, even as it allowed some scope for a retreat in pork and beef profits, in the face of rising animal numbers.   The US protein giant, whose brands include Hillshire Farm and State Fair, said unveiled earnings

Lessons learned from PRRS outbreak investigations

As seen in PigHealthtoday.com By Derald Holtkamp, MS, DVM Iowa State University, College of Veterinary MedicineAmes, Iowa It’s been three decades since veterinarians and researchers first recognized porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS).1 Despite years of research and experience, the disease still causes productivity losses in the US worth $664 million annually.2   Arguably, the

See the Benefits of Cross-protection Against Swine Influenza By Micah L. Jansen, DVM, Pork Technical Services, Zoetis

By Micah L. Jansen, DVM, Pork Technical Services, Zoetis   Can you see swine influenza in your operation right away? Often, we can’t answer this question just by looking because clinical signs aren’t always visible, even when disease is present.1   It is easy to see how quickly this hidden challenge can get out of

Getting pigs off to a good start with better gut health

 As seen in PigHealthtoday.com Podcast: Play in new window | Download Improved education of caretakers is one way pork producers can help ensure their pigs have a healthy gut and get off to a good start, Noel Garbes, DVM, technical services veterinarian, Zoetis, told Pig Health Today. There’s plenty of knowledge and discussion about the

Why PRRS elimination doesn’t work in some herds, By Amber Stricker, DVM Suidae Health and Production Algona, Iowa

By Amber Stricker, DVM Suidae Health and Production Algona, Iowa As seen in PigHealthtoday.com Over the years, there’s been considerable progress in the development of strategies aimed at eliminating porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus (PRRSV). I define successful PRRSV elimination as the absence of clinical disease in the breeding herd and, more importantly, the

Single Biggest Difference between Low Cost and High Cost Producers By: Matt Roberts, Associate Professor at Ohio State

Single Biggest Difference between Low Cost and High Cost Producers By: Matt Roberts, Associate Professor at Ohio State Hi, my name is Matt Roberts and I’m an associate professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Ohio State. I am a grain marketing state specialist there, in addition to an independent consultant and speaker on

Near Real Time Domestic Swine Disease Monitoring Offers Up To Date Picture of Swine Health

Farmscape for November 1, 2017 Full Interview 7:30 Listen The Executive Director of the Swine Health Information Center says Near Real Time Domestic Swine Disease Monitoring will provide swine producers and their veterinarians an up to date picture of the swine health situation across the U.S. In partnership with the Swine Health Information Center the

Identification, treatment and prevention of shoulder lesions in sows

Shoulder lesions are most commonly observed in sows during the weeks following farrowing. Long periods of lying combined with poor body condition can increase the likelihood of sows developing shoulder sores. The prevalence of shoulder lesions varies greatly depending on farm and sow factors, with anywhere from 10 to 50% of sows being affected. Shoulder