News Now from the Iowa Pork Industry Center

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THOUGHTS FROM 109 KILDEE

Welcome
Join us in welcoming Laura Greiner as the newest swine faculty member at Iowa State University. She said she’s ready to combine her education and private industry research experiences to create a great experience for students and pork producers. Since her start date in early November, she’s been refamiliarizing herself with Iowa State’s animal science department, faculty, staff and students, and is enthusiastic about this step in her career. ““I’m excited to be back at Iowa State University and am looking forward to helping others in the swine industry,” she says. Read more in this IPIC news release.

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NEWS

A multistate five-year research project led by IPIC seeks to increase pork producers’ profits by improving the survivability of their animals. IPIC director Jason Ross leads the overall effort of this pig survivability project which includes Kansas State University and Purdue University scientists. The overarching project goal is to improve swine survivability by 1 percent or more each year.


Are you planning travel to countries with African Swine Fever or other foreign animal disease? If you visit a farm or are in contact with animals, be sure to declare this information to U.S. Customs and Border Patrol upon your return to the United States. You should be diverted for an ag secondary screening by an ag specialist. However, reports indicate this required sceening isn’t always happening. To help the industry both understand the scope of this issue and safeguard health of the U.S. swine herd, a combined industry group asked you to report your experience if you do not undergo the required secondary screening when you return from your trip. The Swine Health Information Center (SHIC), National Pork Board, National Pork Producers Council and American Association of Swine Veterinarians are leading this effort, with SHIC executive director Paul Sundberg collecting and aggregating the submitted information. See this article in the SHIC December 2018 newsletter for more detail and requested information.

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PRODUCTION TIP

Taking care of business means taking care of yourself< With winter comes shorter and darker days. We often start chores in the dark and finish in the dark. Did you know that decreased exposure to sunlight can lead to seasonal depression and mood variation? Be sure to take time to enjoy family and extracurricular activities during the coming holidays and winter season, and remember that enjoying time off the job can help with better productivity on the job. The Iowa Concern Hotline offers information, assistance and referrals for a variety of areas. You can call the toll-free number 800-447-1985, look through the lists of “Frequently Asked Questions,” chat online through the website http://www.extension.iastate.edu/iowaconcern/ or browse through the wealth of resources linked from the site.

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IT’S A DATE

Continuing. PQA Plus and TQA producer certification sessions presented by ISU extension swine specialists. See the IPIC website calendar for these and other events.


Dec. Several dates and locations for “Biosecurity Best Practices for Pork Producers” workshops around Iowa. Find your closest location and preregister for these free programs.

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DID YOU KNOW?

Year-end tax considerations and reminders from ISU’s Ag Decision Maker
ISU extension farm management specialist Charles Brown offers reminders on income tax changes that took effect in 2018, including the elimination of the personal exemption deduction and the increase of the standard deduction for those filing jointly to $24,000. And Alejandro Plastina has updated the publication FM 1421, Deductible Livestock Costs for Adjusting 2018 Income Tax Returns. These items and more are in the November Ag Decision Maker, available at no charge on the ADM website.

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FOR THE RECORD

Master Matrix resolution submission deadline is Jan. 31
Counties interested in using the Master Matrix to evaluate construction permit applications for confinement (totally roofed) animal feeding operations must pass and submit a construction evaluation resolution to Iowa DNR between Jan. 1 and 31 for the Master Matrix year that starts in February 2019. The master matrix is a scoring system that can be used to evaluate the siting of permitted confinement feeding operations. Counties that have adopted a construction evaluation resolution can use the master matrix. Producers in counties that have adopted the matrix must meet higher standards than other permitted facilities. To continue to use the master matrix, counties must re-adopt the construction evaluation resolution annually between January 1 and January 31. See more information on the DNR Master Matrix page.

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NEWS NOW, Vol. 18, no. 8

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