Ohio Swine Technical Articles

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Integrated Fly Control at an Eastern Corn Belt Swine Finishing Unit

Dr. Tom Gillespie, DVM University of Purdue; Diplomate, ABVP Swine Health Management Specialty Kevin C. Thorne B.A. DePaul University (case manager) Abstract A study was conducted in the Eastern Corn Belt, to evaluate the efficacy and convenience in applying Flynexx® (Cyromazine) using the 1-2-3 PIT Applicator, within a swine finishing unit. In addition, oral fluids                collected

Evaluation of Temperature Conditions in Trucks During Transport of Market Pigs to Slaughter in Four Seasons

Author(s): Harold Gonyou, Jen Brown, T. S. Samarakone, T. Crowe, S. Torrey, R. Bergeron, T. Widowski, C. Dewey, and L. Faucitano Publication Date: October 5, 2011 Reference: Centred on Swine 17-1 Country: Canada   Summary: Previous research at PSC has shown there is significant variation in conditions (temperature and humidity) among different compartments in trucks

Pain Management and Enrichment for Pigs

Summary: Powerpoint outlining new guidelines that came into place as of July 2016 regarding pain managment and enrichment PAIN MANAGEMENT As of July 1st 2016: Castration performed at any age must be done with analgesics to help control post-procedure pain, while castration performed after 10 days of age must be done with anesthetic and analgesic to

Impact of Feeder Adjustment and Group Size/ Density on Weanling Pig Performance

Author(s): Smith, Laura, A. Denise Beaulieu Ph.D., John F. Patience Ph.D., Harold Gonyou Ph.D., and R. Dean Boyd Ph.D. Publication Date: January 1, 2003 Reference: Manitoba Pork Council Research News, Prairie Swine Centre Country: Canada   Summary: Crowding and/or reduced floor space allowance negatively affects nursery performance and exacerbates social vices such as tail biting,

Adequate gilt acclimation helps minimize the PRRSV ‘tax’

Read more articles on Pig Health Today https://pighealthtoday.com/ By Clayton Johnson, DVM Carthage Veterinary Service Integrated Veterinary Network   Despite decades of intense research and tremendous deployment of resources, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) remains the most costly production disease among swine industries throughout the world. Although some progress has been made, it’s estimated

Genesus Global Technical Report, Big Data

By Nick Boddicker, Ph.D. Geneticist   Data collection and interpretation is a critical part to a swine genetics breeding program. Without data and its interpretation, genetic progress cannot be made. As technology evolves the ability to collect new data emerges, and a successful breeding company will capitalize on these new technologies. Furthermore, as technology evolves,

Genesus Global Technical Report, Minding Your Gilts’ Prenatal Environment

Minding Your Gilts’ Prenatal Environment Pius B. Mwansa, PhD   The lifelong performance of pigs is known to be affected by conditions during gestation (uterine) and early life (neonatal, 21 days after birth). Adverse conditions and stressors during gestation or nursing can have a negative impact on a gilts performance during their lifetime and can

Lessons learned from PRRS outbreak investigations

As seen in PigHealthtoday.com By Derald Holtkamp, MS, DVM Iowa State University, College of Veterinary MedicineAmes, Iowa It’s been three decades since veterinarians and researchers first recognized porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS).1 Despite years of research and experience, the disease still causes productivity losses in the US worth $664 million annually.2   Arguably, the

Why PRRS elimination doesn’t work in some herds, By Amber Stricker, DVM Suidae Health and Production Algona, Iowa

By Amber Stricker, DVM Suidae Health and Production Algona, Iowa As seen in PigHealthtoday.com Over the years, there’s been considerable progress in the development of strategies aimed at eliminating porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus (PRRSV). I define successful PRRSV elimination as the absence of clinical disease in the breeding herd and, more importantly, the

Identification, treatment and prevention of shoulder lesions in sows

Shoulder lesions are most commonly observed in sows during the weeks following farrowing. Long periods of lying combined with poor body condition can increase the likelihood of sows developing shoulder sores. The prevalence of shoulder lesions varies greatly depending on farm and sow factors, with anywhere from 10 to 50% of sows being affected. Shoulder

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